Midwest Dualsport Motorcycle Community 

Pull up a couch. It's cool in the Lounge. Just remember to be a good neighbor.
 #20999  by Motoracer13
 14 Feb 2018 20:18
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It would have been rude of me not to include the Monster Girls, I mean the way they kept asking me personal questions and wanting my phone number and all I figured I would throw them a bone and make them famous on RideForum.net
 #21001  by Motoracer13
 14 Feb 2018 20:35
Thats the owners bike. Its a 2015 set up for Baja. He has that and a 2006 KTM 450 thats the Baja backup ride that we switched back and forth between the two. I LOVE sand and whoops! GPS said I hit 57mph on that road!
 #21009  by Snowman
 15 Feb 2018 17:50
I tried to tackle the northern half of Troys “Osage Dual Sport” route and got myself into a little pickle on some very soft two track yesterday. I actually got stuck about 300 yards before I dropped the bike. I had the brilliant idea to try and climb out of the two track onto the adjacent field, lost momentum and dumped. The tires were actually slightly higher than the handebar and the bar was buried about 2-3 inches into the soft center-mound so I had no leverage to lift.

I ended up having to dig the handlebar out with a screwdriver so I could drag the bike far enough to get the tires to drop into the rut a bit. This gave me enough leverage to lift the pig back upright. Turns out the rest of the road was fine and my stunt to avoid more mud was unneeded.

Long story short, once free from the consequences of my stupidity I decided to head home on ONLY gravel roads. I’ll have to look at the nuclear silo another day. ImageImage


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 #21010  by troy
 15 Feb 2018 19:46
Looks like a yard sale there, Snowman! It's a great route considering how close to the KC metro. Glad you got out there...what a warm winter day! Weatherman told me it will be back down to 20 with single digit windchill by morning. Ugh. :crying:
 #21012  by Snowman
 15 Feb 2018 20:53
Oh yes. Most times (yes, I have picked it up many time) I use the handlebar method. The problem was the handlebar was pinned on the underside of the bike and buried in 2-3” of mud. Additionally the tires were uphill so I couldn’t shift the mass of the bike at all. It was sort of pinned in place between gravity and mud.


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 #21013  by Snowman
 15 Feb 2018 20:55
troy wrote:Looks like a yard sale there, Snowman! It's a great route considering how close to the KC metro. Glad you got out there...what a warm winter day! Weatherman told me it will be back down to 20 with single digit windchill by morning. Ugh. :crying:
Lol. Yes. I shot some video too and called it my “debris field” like when an airplane crashes.


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 #21014  by Creekside
 16 Feb 2018 06:47
Yep, some of those roads are pretty soft this time of year. That's a great area to ride, north and south of Melvern, and out south-west of Reading. Glad to here you got out.
 #21018  by Hank Moody
 16 Feb 2018 11:30
Given my recent back surgeries I'm seriously considering this to help me lift the F800 when I dump it and Troy is not there to lift it for me. It is a little pricey, so Saifri or someone else might be able to direct me to another option.

 #21032  by Ed M
 19 Feb 2018 16:55
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Got out on the 690 yesterday for a few hours, no particular track, just went west and starting following any gravel road that looked interesting.
 #21035  by troy
 19 Feb 2018 19:52
OMG...carry what appears to be a very bulky package weighing 10+ lbs so that you can use 2 people to pull a motorcycle up an obstacle? All I can say is I've been riding a lot of years and in some hairy situations and have never needed this. If you can't pick up your motorcycle by yourself, you either need to ride with people or don't ride. I read a story about a gal solo riding in the mountains. She could not pick up her motorcycle by herself. This is a fact she knew when taking off. Inevitably she laid it down on a remote road. She sat there for something like 8 hours before someone happened to come along.

The closest I got to needing this pulley & rope system was in Arkansas when I led 3 other riders down a terribly steep, leaf-covered "trail" that led to a dead-end. Me and another rider were unable to ride back up. No problem, we had the Hackney boys with us. Those "not fast" riders rode their bikes up, then walked down and rode ours up....like it was nothing. :oops: After that day, my motto is not "Don't ride down something you can't ride up." It is, "Always ride with a Hackney and don't ride down something he can't ride up." This is a fool-proof system for me because Hackneys can ride up stuff I can't even ride down! :-o
 #21190  by safiri
 06 May 2018 08:38
Hank Moody wrote:
16 Feb 2018 11:30
Given my recent back surgeries I'm seriously considering this to help me lift the F800 when I dump it and Troy is not there to lift it for me. It is a little pricey, so Saifri or someone else might be able to direct me to another option.

Appears to be what whitewater boaters call a "z drag", used for boat recovery if wedged / current. Really a block and tackle. Similar to a "trucker's hitch" which I use when securing loads to roof or trailer with rope.

Take a look at these:
https://www.rapidmedia.com/rapid/catego ... ond-z-drag
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/8e/fb/32 ... 7a7145.jpg
https://borealriver.com/en/learn/whitew ... er-rescue/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trucker%27s_hitch

More images: (choose images)
https://www.google.com/search?q=homemade+z+drag

A much lighter system could be had with tubular webbing (just looked up some 5/8" rated at 9kN = 2025 lbs), which packs down much better than rope. Ditch the pulleys, as tubular webbing will slide through a carabiner without much friction (and the motion will be slow so little heat buildup). Don't attempt to slide webbing on webbing.

So you need webbing for the following:
1. loop around your anchor (tree?)
2. loop around your forks. (Or attach a grab strap and leave in place as I have on my KTM. Sew fork tube loops in both ends of a hunk of webbing. Lower forks, thread through loops. I reused some orange webbing that HomeDepot used to secure a lumber load.)
3. go between anchor and moto with a double back; figure double the max separation distance.

Add three carabiners (one for each end and one at midpoint) and a prusik (to allow you to lock progress). The midpoint carabiner can be attached by putting a slip knot in the webbing.

If the webbing changes direction at the anchor, you haven't gained any mechanical advantage.
If the webbing changes direction at the load, you have doubled your force.
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