Midwest Dualsport Motorcycle Community 

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 #11595  by troy
 21 Oct 2012 15:13
Until Mr. GS Giant can reply, I'll chime in. I love my Great Basin, and use it on my BMW F800 GS. The bag is not cheap, but it should last many years, and for the off-road scenarios I always end up in, this bag serves me well.
http://www.giantloopmoto.com/products/g ... -saddlebag
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More recently, I purchased Giant Loop's Mojave bag system for my KTM 450 EXC. I used it on our 3 day AR ride, and it was PERFECT. It really was even better than I expected. It never moved and I hardly noticed it even on ATV trails and single-track.
http://www.giantloopmoto.com/collection ... -saddlebag
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 #11599  by troy
 21 Oct 2012 17:58
Perhaps I should add that the Great Basin bag is a pain in the arse to get in and out of. You have to remove at least 3 straps and sometimes 5 depending on what you need to get out. Standard side and top cases are a breeze to open when you quickly need to get something. The Great Basin not so much. But it serves a different purpose--it's for the big bike adventurer who gets into gnarly stuff and does not want to worry about denting and destroying side cases or having a side case take a chunk out of your leg in a crash.

On that AR ride, Steve had the Coyote bag, which is similar but smaller than the Great Basin. If you plan to do overnight trips--especially if you plan to camp--the Coyote is a better choice verses the Mojave because it holds a lot more.
http://www.giantloopmoto.com/collection ... -saddlebag
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The Mojave is great for day trips or light overnight stuff. The 3 bag design is easy to get in and out of compared to the Coyote or Great Basin.
 #11606  by ajayhawkfan
 21 Oct 2012 22:35
I have not use my bag yet but it looks great and it well made. I expect years of use.

I saw what Troy wrote about being a pain to get in. That maybe the case. I see the ease, I hope, in getting it off the bike to bring into my room. I would hope getting into the bag would be much easier.

When I start using I will let let everyone know.
 #11607  by bird man
 21 Oct 2012 23:33
I have the coyote and have used it on several trips for a couple years. I really like it....carries the weight low ,doesn't move about, easy on and off the bike. You quickly learn to pack things that you might want during the day on the road on top for easy access. It can be a little fussy getting everything packed in just right ,but the inner tote packs/bags that come with it really help. Another nice thing , if you don't use all the space capacity just fold down the extra bag and cinch it with the straps now your pack is smaller.
 #11608  by grindstone
 22 Oct 2012 05:16
Thanks everyone. Especially about the pain in arse bit. I suspected that but would imagine that would depend upon how much was stuffed in it.

I now have a DL1000 that has Givi 21's and a large Coocase top case. The side cases stick out and I can tell a difference when I take them off. Larger capacity side cases would stick out more except perhaps the Happy Trails 7" wide but I wouldn't like the 5.5" opening. Looks like the Giant Loops would tuck in closer and the ability to unstrap and carry the whole shebang into the room has me thinking that is my answer.
 #11609  by troy
 22 Oct 2012 07:41
I had a Vstrom 650 with plastic Givi cases side and top. I loved those cases. Very light weight, water-proof, locking, and durable--very easy to work with. A snap to take off the bike and take into motel room--look like suitcases basically. You can pack your cases in your comfy temperature controlled motel room then at the last minute take them out and snap them onto the bike.

The Great Basin bags are a different deal completely. They are for when you will be riding stuff rough enough that it matters to keep that weight in tight and low. They are for when you are riding stuff rough enough that laying the bike down a few times is inevitable.

I love my Giant Loop Great Basin bag, but I wish I had my Givi cases for more relaxed travels or around town.

I've never owned the aluminum cases, and I know there are 50,000 riders ready to defend them to the death, but from my naive viewpoint, they are heavy, expensive, only waterproof until you bend them, and square corners could do some wicked damage in an accident. The argument for aluminum cases over plastic (like Givi) is their durability. However, I've done the math, and I could smash 3 plastic Givi cases to one common aluminum case. Also note that I did in fact break a Givi case off on a stump along the trail. It worked perfectly as designed--the latch mechanism broke (as designed) which allowed the case to come off---virtually undamaged. I just hooked it back onto the mounting tabs and used a bungee cord to hold it onto the bike for the rest of the ride. Givi sells replacement latches for $15, so I was good as new after a 5 minute repair.

The moral of the story is that for me personally, I want plastic, rounded cases for casual riding. When I get into stuff that demands the strength of aluminum cases, I'd rather have the Great Basin bag.
 #11613  by ajayhawkfan
 22 Oct 2012 12:55
I do that aluminum cans. As Troy mentioned they leak as soon as you bend them so mine leak. (I deal with the leaking with water resistant liners and very absorbent towels around the seals.) I will continue to use them when doing easier dual sport rides and when I'm going for longer periods of time because I don't pack that small. I plan on using the giant loop bags for shorter overnight trips and riding rougher roads over longer periods of time.
 #14153  by troy
 06 Sep 2013 07:03
MoRidin found this Giant Loop Mojave knock-off. I think it looks great and the price is VERY good....but...there is some heated discussion over on AdvRider about this manufacturer stealing intellectual property from Giant Loop. Also, based on the experiences of some folks in that thread, it seems clear the bag is not the same quality as the GL...but...$120...

http://www.nomadrider.com/outnbacknomad ... ilbag.aspx
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 #14155  by Bob Morgan
 06 Sep 2013 08:46
troy wrote: it seems clear the bag is not the same quality as the GL...but...$120...
Giant Loop clearly states Made in America on their web site, and the knock off doesn't mention where it is manufactured. I think we can all figure out what means.

These days it's tough to make the decision to buy American made products since we are forced to purchase so many thing made in china on a daily basis. It's a moral dilemma for me. Curse you Harbor Freight! :|
 #14156  by troy
 06 Sep 2013 09:24
Bob Morgan wrote:These days it's tough to make the decision to buy American made products since we are forced to purchase so many thing made in china on a daily basis. It's a moral dilemma for me. Curse you Harbor Freight! :|
For me it comes down to quality. "Buying American" does not always automatically mean higher quality, but it usually does. The lines are getting blurred as where components are made and products assembled becomes more globally dispersed.

It is very sad that the mass public will choose a crap-quality version of an item at $9.95 rather than pay $17.95 for a high-quality product. Thanks, Walmart. ...and that is only really a problem when it forces the quality manufacturer out of business so we no longer even have the choice to buy a quality product.

It seems most people would rather own 1,000 junk items than 100 high-quality items. I want fewer things that are as high quality as I can get.
 #14159  by Savage
 06 Sep 2013 12:51
troy wrote: I want fewer things that are as high quality as I can get.
Then you should sell your bikes and buy a KLR. :lol:

As for the bags, the best version I've seen are a pair of Levi's. Just ziptie the legs, have someone put a heavy duty American made zipper across the waistband, then fill your pants up with all your crap and sit it on your bike and strap it down. Done deal!
 #14160  by troy
 06 Sep 2013 14:10
Savage wrote:As for the bags, the best version I've seen are a pair of Levi's. Just ziptie the legs, have someone put a heavy duty American made zipper across the waistband, then fill your pants up with all your crap and sit it on your bike and strap it down. Done deal!
Use some of those heavy-duty jeans with kevlar in them, and that actually could work well. That design is a great way to distribute the weight on a dirtbike.
 #14163  by safiri
 07 Sep 2013 06:27
troy wrote:
Savage wrote:As for the bags, the best version I've seen are a pair of Levi's. Just ziptie the legs, have someone put a heavy duty American made zipper across the waistband, then fill your pants up with all your crap and sit it on your bike and strap it down. Done deal!
Use some of those heavy-duty jeans with kevlar in them, and that actually could work well. That design is a great way to distribute the weight on a dirtbike.
Finally a use for my old Joe Rocket moto pants ... :D
 #14219  by HanesAnizer
 18 Sep 2013 21:00
I looked at a number of different bags/luggage options and struggled with spending the $$. I was hoping to find a cheap(er) solution, but unfortunately my bike doesn't have any real connection points on the subframe. This made using generic dry bags and various straps or bungees not so easy or appealing. Sooo...after seeing Wolfman saddlebags on James DRZ at the TARKC meeting, they looked liked the perfect solution.

Impressions so far...great, simple and (appears) very secure attachment to the bike. They are not waterproof so what I want to keep dry will need to be in a zip lock or dry bag. The bags are very well made and should be durable. I also purchased one of the Wolfman Rolie bags, medium, to put on the seat. The saddlebags have basically 4 D rings on the main straps that go across the seat. The rolie straps attach to these D rings and mount the bag securely...assuming the saddlebags stay secure. The rolie is a very high quality dry bag perfect for essentials you without doubt want to keep dry.

Couple of quick pics I took -
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